Reaction to New York Post's ugly headline
This letter, written by Harvey Rosenthal, responded to an ugly headline in the New York Post. The article discussed New York's attempts to enhance community programs, improve hospital discharge planning, and make the lives of all New Yorkers better. The headline, "Cost Of Kooks & Junkies," brought this response from Harvey Rosenthal, NYAPRS. To the Editor, The quality of the Post's coverage has sunk to an outrageously low level in a headline editor's choice of 'Cost of Kooks and Junkies'... []
The language of illness
. . .physical and mental []
Celebrities enlisted to fight stigma
Celebrities are using their platform to combat stigma and publicize recovery with new energy. Connie Francis, who was involuntarily admitted to psychiatric hospitals 17 times in nine years, is now working with Mental Health America in a continual battle to publicize recovery. "It is now my intention to be a voice for those suffering from mental disorders and to make them aware that there is hope and light at the end of an often bleak and interminable tunnel," she said. . . []
Rosalynn Carter active during mental health month
Since 1949, May has traditionally been set aside for "Mental Health Month" a time when advocates, book publishers, and not-for-profits are slotted into news coverage. This year bring attention to the publication of a new book by one of the nation's most respected and admired advocates for long over-due reform of mental health services, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter. Mrs. Carter has spent nearly 50 years as a spokesperson, and she is now touring. . . []
Prism Award goes to Jeff Bridges, Maggie Gyllenhaal
"Crazy Heart" stars Jeff Bridges and Maggie Gyllenhaal received the Prism Award for their accurate depictions of " substance abuse and mental health issues." Prism Awards come from the Entertainment Industries Council (EIC) in collaboration with SAMHSA to reduce stigma and spread public awareness. . . []
Teleconference on media and mental health
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A March teleconference about the media's impact on images of mental health, sponsored by SAMHSA was made available on their website. . . []
Crisis of college suicides
The suicide of a Yale University student has left the community mournful and in shock. The Yale junior who took his life in New York City last week is the latest in a rash at colleges in recent months. Suicide on college campuses is the second leading cause of death. Cornell University, which reports six this year, has taken steps to erect barriers at various bridges over the gorges. The student paper also knows this is a temporary solution. . . []
British campaigns ban mental health derision
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Politicians in Great Britain have struck a deal not to engage in accusations, slurs about a candidate's mental health status or treatment. It is intended to permit greater conversation about mental health issues without recrimination. . . []
Mental health in background of upcoming political campaigns
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Political candidates are no longer ducking mental health issues as if they disqualified them from office. []
Princeton students discover lives behind diagnosis
When a class of Princeton students took the bus to New York City for a week-long student project, Sophie Jin's goal was to learn more about the lives of people with serious mental illness. A junior in the Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs, she and her classmates expected to see the workings of stigma. But after meeting and talking with consumers, psychiatrists, members of the helping profession, they discovered the rich, complex lives often dismissed categorically simply... []
Rose Hill defends rehab model, deflects critics
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Last month a Michigan treatment program does what makes it proud: it helped a resident who had demonstrated a successful course of therapy return to the community where he was rebuilding his life. The problem was the local community, which dredged up the past. Read Gayle Flanigan's account of how stigma remains a barrier for some with a mental illness. []
Anti-stigma campaign draws millions
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Screen and stage star Glenn Close, and an advocate for people with mental illness, is the moving force behind a public awareness campaign to undue stigma. . . []
Violence with psychosis rare toward strangers
Worries about violence and mental illness have affected public attitudes and influenced treatment options around the world. Researchers in Canada, Finland, Australia and the Netherlands looked at "stranger homicide" as a way to answer the question about whether psychosis threatens strangers. []
Depression screening during Mental Illness Awareness Week
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Depression screening will be a center piece to Mental Illness Awareness Week. Follow-up reports to screening leads organizers to believe it led to treatment that might not have been pursued. The kickoff took place with a symposium on military mental health in Washington. Elsewhere. . . []
Doughnut war ends
Protests brought publicity, but the owner of a doughnut shop in Northern California sold out to his partner and thus ended the placards protesting Psycho Donuts in Silicon Valley. Insults and degrading decor are now also gone and, for a moment, there is a truce at the intersection where demonstrators once stood. "It was obvious that the owners didn't understand how offensive their mental-hospital theme was," writes Patty Fisher in the Mercury News. Now they do.... []
If you want to promote stigma
. . .check this out []
Stigma starts early in childhood
Children believe if someone tries hard enough, he or she can overcome ADHD or depression, suggest authors. . . []
Mental illness does not predict violence
A new study concludes that mental illness alone does not predict violence. For the past two decades, debate about a putative link between mental illness and violence has been heated with implications for policy, treatment and legal decisions. The authors of this study, published in Archives of General Psychiatry, interviewed 34,500 people in a national sample who were diagnosed with schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder and major depression. Their findings, based on interviews roughly 3 years apart, indicate that of the numerous... []
Celebrities, stigma, and re-runs
. . .an update []
Black youth and suicide
After the on-line suicide of a 19-year-old from Florida, Newsweek online spoke with University of Michigan expert, Dr. Sean Joe. Suicide is the third leading cause of death for black men. Joe noted that stigma influences "the ways in which men perceive what it means to seek help for mental-health issues." ... []
Resources for college students
To help colleges meet the needs of students with a mental illness, two resources were recently released. Building Bridges from SAMHSA is a rich resource describing problems students have encountered, offering solutions student consumers recommend, and providing community resources. The Jed Foundation makes available Student Mental Health and the Law which answers questions about disabilities, the law, and services. Each is available in a pdf download.... []
General talks about PTSD and stigma
On the eve of Veterans Day, Army Maj. Gen. David Blackledge is reminding the country that soldiers suffering from war-related trauma can benefit from treatment. Blackledge received psychiatric counseling for the symptoms of PTSD while recovering from combat injuries he received in Iraq. ... []
Colleges proactive about mental health
The needs of students attending college while managing a mental illness are being addressed more openly than ever before. In the month of September, typically associated with "back-to-school" news, NPR aired stories about managing depression, and campus organization such as Active Minds, Graduate students are writing about how knowledge of one's illness can influence how to select a program. Last week the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law released a guide, Campus Mental Health with detailed information about legal rights... []
Colleges proactive about mental health
The needs of students attending college while managing a mental illness are being addressed more openly than ever before. In the month of September, typically associated with "back-to-school" news, NPR aired stories about managing depression, and campus organization such as Active Minds, Graduate students are writing about how knowledge of one's illness can influence how to select a program. Last week the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law released a guide, Campus Mental Health with detailed information about legal rights... []
Helping college students: PADs on campus
When college students need help because of a mental illness, schools often don't know where to turn. Helping college students: PADs on campus could offer an answer. Dean Anna Scheyett and Adrienne Rooks (School of Social Work, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) explain how psychiatric advance directives can enlist students, faculty and administrators. []

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